Thamnophis sauritus

Scientific name:
Thamnophis sauritussauritus

Dutch name:
Oostelijke Lintslang

English name:
Eastern Ribbon Snake

German name:
Östliche Bändernatter

Subspecies:
Thamnophis sauritus nitae (Blue-striped ribbon snake)
Thamnophis sauritus sackenii (Florida ribbon snake)
Thamnophis sauritus sauritus (Eastern ribbon snake)
Thamnophis sauritus septentrionalis (Northern ribbon snake)

Pictures of Thamnophis sauritus…

Range:
Thamnophis sauritus nitae – Coastal area in north-western Florida, the Withlacoochee River in the south into Wakulla County.
Thamnophis sauritus sackenii – southern Carolina, south-eastern Georgia and Florida.
Thamnophis sauritus sauritus – from Southern New England west south westward through southern Ohio and southern Indiana to the Mississippi River. Southward further into the of the eastern United States, except south-eastern Georgia and Florida.
Thamnophis sauritus septentrionalis – From Nova Scotia westward to Wisconsin.

Habitat:
All kinds of waters that are overgrown with scrubs, etc.

Food:
Mainly fish and amphibians, but also eats small animals mammals and invertebrates.

Reproduction:
Dependent on the distribution the young are born in the months of July, August or September. Between 3 and 26 young per litter which approximately are 20 cm long at birth.

Terrarium:
Because of their mobility they need a large terrarium. A large water bowl is necessary. Because it are quite nervous animals (and often remain nervous) there must surely be a number of shelters available.
This species needs a lot of climbing opportunities.
Depending on the origin/subspecies you have to give a two to three-month brumation.
This species is kept quite a lot and bred successfully.

Specifics:
Length about 50 to 100 cm.
This species occurs at altitudes between 0 and 600 meters

Is a slender, skittish species with a long tail that climbs very well.
Is strongly tied to the presence of water.

The two parietal spots on top of the head are small, not clear in colour and do not touch each other. At Thamnophis proximus they are brightly coloured, usually rather large and usually touch each other.

 


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